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October 2017 Panel Discussion in Dallas: How to Turn a Mess of Pages into a Book

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10/10/2017



Location
Interabang Books
10720 Preston Rd. Ste. 1009B
Dallas, TX 75230

10/10/2017 From 7 pm to 9 pm


PANEL DISCUSSION 

How to Turn a Mess of Pages Into A Book

Join us for a panel at Interabang Books in Dallas.

 

First drafts of novels and memoirs can begin with a spark of an idea and a rush of enthusiasm. But after 70-100 pages, that initial clarity often vanishes, along with any sense of the way forward into the book. Or perhaps you're researching for a nonfiction project, but you feel lost at the thought of organizing your notes into a coherent narrative. This panel will discuss strategies for shaping early drafts of book-length projects and giving them direction—a must-attend event for anyone who has recently thrown themselves into a new project or wants to return to a memoir or nonfiction draft that they've put aside.

Our event in Dallas will feature four distinguished panelists, including: 

Sanderia Faye serves on the faculty at Southern Methodist University, is an instructor at the 2017 Desert Nights Rising Stars Conference at Arizona State University, and a professional speaker and activist. Her novel, Mourner’s Bench, is the winner of the Hurston/Wright Legacy Award in debut fiction, The Philosophical Society of Texas Award of Merit for fiction, and The 2017 Arkansas Library Association, Arkansiana Award. She is co-founder and a fellow at Kimbilio Center for Fiction, and her work has appeared in the anthology Arsnick: The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee in Arkansas. Faye moderated the grassroots panel for the Arkansas Civil Rights Symposium during the Freedom Riders 50th Anniversary and is coordinating the first AWP African Diaspora Caucus.

Her work received “Best Of” honors at the 2011 Eckerd College Writers’ Conference, Co –Directors Dennis Lehane and Sterling Watson, where her winning excerpt from the novel was published in SABAL Literary Journal. She received grants and scholarships offers from Hurston/Wright Writers Conference, Eckerd College Writers’ in Paradise Conference, Callaloo Writers Workshop, and Vermont, Writers Studio. She attended The Writers' Colony at Dairy Hollow and Martha’s Vineyard Writers Residency.

She holds an MFA from Arizona State University, a MA from the University of Texas at Dallas, a BS in Accounting from the University of Arkansas. She is currently a PhD candidate in English at the University of North Texas where she was nominated for the University of North Texas Wingspan Presidential Award For Excellence.

 

Sarah Hepola is the author of the New York Times bestseller, Blackout: Remembering the Things I Drank to Forget. Her writing has been published in Texas Monthly, the Guardian, the New York Times magazine, Elle, Glamour, Jezebel, Buzzfeed, Slate, and Salon, where she was the personal essays editor for many years. She lives in Dallas.

Jeramey Kraatz is the author of The Cloak Society and Space Runners series from HarperCollins. His prose has been featured in places like Salon, Gizmodo, McSweeney’s Internet Tendency, and Gigantic Sequins. Jeramey is a graduate of Texas Christian University and the MFA writing program at Columbia University. He lives in Texas, where he writes scripts for the cartoon industry and sometimes teaches. You can find him at www.jerameykraatz.com or on Twitter @jerameykraatz.

Michael Merschel is the author of the debut novel Revenge of the Star Survivors (Holiday House). For more than 20 years, he’s been an editor at The Dallas Morning News; for the past decade, he has overseen books coverage. As a freelance humorist, he has contributed to public radio’s A Prairie Home Companion and had two short plays produced by Dallas’ Ground Zero Theater Company. He also composed an out-of-office reply that was mentioned in The New York Times and featured on NPR. Although he was once a Human of New York, he lives in suburban Dallas with his wife and three kids, who say he is not all that funny, usually.